Building Map Page

Our home is more than brick and mortar - it breathes.

Bamboo ceilings, cork wallcoverings and wool carpets are organized functionally to grace our Archives Block and Think Block areas. A planted Living Roof resembles an actual prairie that changes with the seasons. Large windows and sunshades help with energy efficiency. A collage of paths, water and shady walkways lined with trees winds throughout our campus. Every element combines to give you one continuous green experience – the minute your feet touch our solar-reflective parking pavement.

Rollover a numbered icon to view the sustainable feature.

 

 

 

 

 

Water Efficiency:
Low-flow fixtures mean our employees who bike to work can save energy even when they’re freshening up. Low-flow faucets, dual-flush toilets and waterless urinals reduce water use 60% over EPA standards.

 

Indoor Environmental Quality:
Daylight and views don’t require fixtures and electricity. Thanks to our expansive windows, natural sunlight pours in through more than 75% of our building. “Daylighting” cuts energy use and provides better-quality light. Plus, the views are just breathtaking.

 

Materials and Resources:
On-site recycling helps to conserve our natural resources and reduce solid waste and the pressure on landfills. Operations for the facility include provisions for the pick-up and processing of materials for recycling. The administrative areas and public spaces have recycling containers for paper, metals, glass and plastic.

 

Materials and Resources:
Wood finish materials aren’t always responsibly harvested. At BRIT we used both certified hardwood such as ash and recovered wood. The sinker cypress wall in the foyer comes from cypress logs that sank to the bottom of the river as they were being transported to market over 100 years ago. Once retrieved and dried, cypress wood looks beautiful and makes sense. It has become the eco-friendly building lumber of choice.

 

Materials and Resources:
Wool carpet and bamboo ceilings are examples of rapidly renewable materials - defined by LEED as those harvested within six-year cycles. Not all renewables are equal, with many taking generations to come back. BRIT’s use of linen and paper wallcoverings reduces the need for non-renewables such as petroleum-based products.

 

Materials and Resources:
Recycled-content materials were used for over 20% of BRIT’s building materials. The most significant recycled-content materials are structural steel, steel pipes and other metal products. Gypsum board and the acoustical ceiling panels are made from recycled sheetrock. The rubber-based floors are made from recycled tennis shoes and other rubbers, like tires and single-ply roofing membrane.

 

Materials and Resources:
Indoor air quality means less chemical exposure. All adhesives, paints, and coatings comply with established LEED standards. Low volatile organic compounds (VOC) carpets, floorings, and composite woods were selected to contribute to a healthy indoor environment. Instead of using standard insulating materials for the walls made with formaldehyde and fiberglass, BRIT’s wall insulation is made from sand and post-consumer recycled glass bottles, baked and blown like cotton candy. 
 

 

Materials and Resources:
Indoor air quality means clean air to breathe. Air ducts were covered from the time of delivery until the time they were turned on, the above ceiling spaces were cleaned before we closed, and “air-scrubbing” machines were used when conducting dust producing activities - all to prevent dust and particulates from building up and affecting occupants. Carpets are 100% wool, a natural product without fumes from the harsh solvents that are used in traditional carpet manufacturing.
 

 

Materials and Resources:
Lighting is designed to reduce the amount of energy used by standard incandescent light bulbs; indoor lighting is provided by fluorescent and LED lights. In addition, smart lighting with motion detectors and light harvesting sensors decreases as the natural light in the room increases, while growing brighter with reduced outside light. Sunshades on the south, east and west elevations allow light into the building while reducing the amount of solar heat gain gathered through the windows.  This contributes natural lighting for occupants while reducing the amount of work the AC system has to do to cool the building in the heat of the day, thus conserving energy.