BRIT and TCU Sign Education and Research Memorandum Of Agreement

BRIT and TCU Sign Education and Research Memorandum Of Agreement

September 25, 2017

Students in TCU’s College of Science & Engineering and College of Education will study and work with BRIT’s plant science Ph.D.s to fulfill degree requirements

 

FORT WORTH, Texas (September 25, 2017) – The Botanical Research Institute of Texas  and Texas Christian University announce an education and research partnership that enhances and expands the University’s delivery of its undergraduate and graduate programs.

Undergraduate and graduate students in TCU’s College of Science & Engineering and College of Education will work with BRIT’s Ph.D. botanists and research staff performing plant science and field research to help satisfy their degree requirements.

“BRIT’s unique experiential learning coupled with its research labs and herbarium add a new learning dimension to our educational programs,” says Dr. Nowell Donovan, TCU Provost & Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. “Graduates from these TCU schools will be better prepared to make substantial contributions to their employers and to the environment as they enter the fields of their choice.”

The agreement provides the ability for qualified BRIT research scientists to develop and teach classes through appointment as TCU adjunct faculty. They will also help direct undergraduate research and after gaining Associate Graduate Faculty status, serve on graduate thesis committees.

The program is expected to be ready for its first students in fall 2018.

“In our 30th year, BRIT is realizing its true potential as a regional research and education institution with the signing of this MOA,” says Dr. Ed Schneider, BRIT’s executive director. “We are aggressively pursuing academic and public partnerships that will advance conservation knowledge to the next generation of leaders.”

There is a joint signing ceremony for a Memorandum of Agreement scheduled on October 2, 2017 at 2 p.m. in BRIT’s atrium, followed by a brief reception.

 

About the Botanical Research Institute of Texas

The Botanical Research Institute of Texas (BRIT®) is a non-profit, international research and education center that collects and safeguards plant specimens, studies and protects living plants, and teaches about the importance of conservation and biodiversity to the world.

BRIT’s scientists and educators work together in achieving the organization’s two-fold mission of conservation and education. Its scientists travel the globe investigating habitats, finding rare and endangered plant species, and documenting biodiversity. BRIT educators create new ways to turn information into knowledge through outdoor discovery, discussion, and experiential learning for both students and teachers.

BRIT’s work impacts our community and the world in a number of functional areas, including environment, by giving people a local sense of stewardship; society, by training a new generation of thinkers and problem solvers; and conservation, by offering methods for better stewardship of the land.

BRIT is open to the public Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on the first Saturday of each month from 9 a.m. to noon. Admission is free. For more information, visit http://www.brit.org.

About Texas Christian University

Founded in 1873, TCU is a world-class, values-centered private university based in Fort Worth, Texas. The University comprises eight schools and colleges offering 119 areas of undergraduate study, 53 master’s level programs, and 28 areas of doctoral study. Total enrollment stands at 10,394, including 8,892 undergraduates and 1,502 graduate students. The student/faculty ratio is about 13:1, and 85 percent of TCU’s 641 full-time faculty members hold the highest degree in their discipline. TCU consistently ranks among the top universities and colleges in the nation, and the Horned Frog family consists of more than 88,000 living alumni. For more information, please visit www.tcu.edu.

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