Library Past Exhibitions

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Brandy Watts

BRIT Librarian

Past Exhibitions

The Perilous Texas Adventures of Mark Dion Photographs

Mark Dion

February 2020 - April 2020

Photographs on view are from the most recent book of Mark Dion's published in conjunction with his upcoming exhibition at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art The Perilous Texas Adventures of Mark Dion on view February 8, 2020 - May 17, 2020. This Library exhibition is part of an institutional collaboration between BRIT and the Amon Carter Museum of American Art (ACMAA).

The ACMAA sponsored Barney Lipscomb and Tiana Rehman to serve as botanical guides to West Texas for artist Mark Dion. Commissioned by the ACMAA, Mark—a contemporary artist who is part explorer, part historian, part naturalist, and part collector—has made a series of exploratory journeys through Texas that are inspired by four early naturalists/artists in Texas: Sarah Ann Lillie Hardinge (1824–1913), John James Audubon (1785–1851), Frank Law Olmsted (1822–1903), and Charles Wright (1811–1885).

Photographs previously on view in the Library are below. All photographs courtesy of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art.

Seeds
Various nuts and seeds collected by Mark Dion in west Texas, July 2018, digital ink jet print. Photograph courtesy of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas.
Spider
 Black Widow spider collected by Mark Dion in west Texas, July 2018, digital ink jet print. Photograph courtesy of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas.
Press
Plant presses used by Mark Dion, 2018-2020, digital ink jet print. Photograph courtesy of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art.
Flower
Plant specimen collected by Mark Dion in Marathon, Texas, July 2018, digital ink jet print. Photograph courtesy of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art.
Cactus
Plant specimen collected by Mark Dion in Marathon, Texas, July 2018, digital ink jet print. Photograph courtesy of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art.
Bones
Bones collected by Mark Dion in West Texas, July 2018, digital ink jet print. Photograph courtesy of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art.
Snakeskin
Snake skin collected by Mark Dion in west Texas, July 2018, digital ink jet print. Photograph courtesy of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art.
Viles
 Various specimens collected by Mark Dion in Galveston, Texas, March 2018, digital ink jet print. Photograph courtesy of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art.
Viles
 Various specimens collected by Mark Dion in Galveston, Texas, March 2018, digital ink jet print. Photograph courtesy of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art.
Book
The Perilous Texas Adventures of Mark Dion, 2020, Photograph courtesy of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art.

Past Exhibitions

Among the Birds and Flora of Texas

Among the Birds and Flora of Texas

September 2019 - February 2020

Texas is composed of a great diversity of ecoregions, which give rise to an array of flora and fauna that are inextricably enmeshed. Of the many behaviors of birds found across wetlands, plateau, prairie, desert, hills, canyons, and along the coast of Texas is the tendency to gather, perch, flit, trill, and flutter among the diverse vegetation. Whether exotic, native, endemic, or cultivated, the flora throughout Texas invites and ensures spaces for birdlife to coexist with biological phenomena. To this end, Among the Birds and Flora of Texas brings to light the central and reciprocal nature of plants in the lives of birds through a selection of prints from Scott and Stuart Gentling’s Of Birds And Texas limited edition folio. Plant specimens from the BRIT Herbarium as well as rare materials from the BRIT Library’s Special Collection accompany the prints to highlight the botanical aspects that are evident in the Gentling’s studies of Texas birdlife.

This exhibition is running concurrently with the Amon Carter Museum of American Art’s exhibit Seeing in Detail: Scott and Stuart Gentling’s Birds of Texas, which is on view September 2019 - March 2020.

Roxburgh

William Roxburgh

June 2019 - August 2019

William Roxburgh (1751–1815), "The Founding Father of Indian Botany," who spent more than thirty years of his life in India, was an eminent Scottish botanist. He drew Indian plants for the East India Company using a team of artists working for him in Calcutta. The East India Company was founded in 1600 by Queen Elizabeth I for the purposes of trade with East and Southeast Asia and India.

In 1778, the company set up a post called "Naturalist and Botanist", or “Naturalist to the Madras Government," whose job it was to investigate and test plants that might be adapted for medicine or trade. Roxburgh took up the Madras post in 1776. In 1793, he went to Calcutta to be the first Superintendent of the Honourable Company’s Botanic Garden (founded in 1786). While in Calcutta, Roxburgh continued the custom that he had started in Madras of training and employing Indian artists to record plants grown in the garden and other species of interest.