Research Lecture Series

Brown Bag Lunchtime Lectures & BRIT Research Seminars

The BRIT Lecture Series is designed to create community wide conversation about a diverse range of important and rapidly developing topics. This series gives scientists and speakers a forum for sharing the most current information about their areas of expertise and allows the public to interact with leading members of the local, national, and international scientific community.

Our Lecture Series is made up of Brown Bag Lunchtime Lectures and BRIT Research Seminars. Brown Bags take place the first Tuesday of each month, February – July and September – November, from noon - 1pm in the BRIT Commons. Research Seminars take place periodically throughout the year and are scheduled based on the availability of our in-house and visiting researchers.

All events are free and open to the public, please watch this page and our Facebook page for announcements of upcoming Brown Bags and BRIT Researcher Seminars. 

Program Information

Brown Bag Lectures
Dates: First Tuesday of each month
Time: 12 - 1pm
Location: BRIT Commons
Cost: Free, Open to the Public

BRIT Research Seminars
Date: Various dates throughout year
Time: 12 - 1pm 
Location: BRIT Commons
Cost: Free, Open to the Public
Visit the event page for specific date and time information.

Point of Contact

Brooke Byerley Best, Ph.D.

Director of Research Programs

The BRIT Lecture Series is designed to create community wide conversation about a diverse range of important and rapidly developing topics. This series gives scientists and speakers a forum for sharing the most current information about their areas of expertise and allows the public to interact with leading members of the local, national, and international scientific community.

Our Lecture Series is made up of Brown Bag Lunchtime Lectures and BRIT Research Seminars. Brown Bags take place the first Tuesday of each month, February – July and September – November, from noon - 1pm in the BRIT Commons. Research Seminars take place periodically throughout the year and are scheduled based on the availability of our in-house and visiting researchers.

All events are free and open to the public, please watch this page and our Facebook page for announcements of upcoming Brown Bags and BRIT Researcher Seminars. 

Upcoming Events

Why Are There So Many Dang Daisies?

ONLINE LECTURE (ZOOM)

More Info >

Why Are There So Many Dang Daisies?

A Brown Bag Lecture by Dr. Bort (Robert) Edwards

The Asteraceae (or Compositae) family of plants is incredibly diverse, with members including sunflowers, daisies, thistles, marigolds, lettuce, artichokes, and many many more. So diverse are they that they make up over 10% of the flowering plant species in North America, yet no one is quite sure why they are so numerous and successful. In this talk Dr. Bort (Robert) Edwards will take you on a tour of this fascinating group of plants and explain some of his research into how the extremeness of the North American environment is responsible for their distribution and diversity.

This lecture will take place online. Please check back soon for registration information. 

The commonness of rarity —evolution and endemism in South American clubmosses

ONLINE LECTURE (ZOOM)

More Info >

The commonness of rarity —evolution and endemism in South American clubmosses

A Brown Bag Lecture by Dr. Weston Testo

A conspicuous feature of Earth’s biological diversity is that some species are widespread and common, whereas others are extremely rare and narrowly distributed. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain this pattern, but data are sparse and taxonomically biased. In this talk, Dr. Testo will explore the commonness of rarity in clubmosses (Lycopodiaceae), focusing on the group’s successful diversification in the mountains of South America and corresponding patterns of endemism in these habitats. 

Twitter: @westo_fernnerd

Website: www.westontesto.com

Dr. Testo holding a clubmoss
Dr. Testo holding a clubmoss

This lecture will take place online. Register in advance for this meeting:
[link forthcoming]

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Textiles from Trees: Ugandan Bark Cloth

ONLINE LECTURE

More Info >

Textiles from Trees: Ugandan Bark Cloth

A Brown Bag Lecture by Lesli Robertson

For centuries and into today, bark from a specific tree is stripped, beaten, and used by the people of Uganda. The tree, with its bark removed, does not die, but grows its outer covering back to be used again and again, year after year.

Lubugo, or Ugandan barkcloth, has a diverse history from clothing kings to finding its way onto fashion runways in Europe. Lesli Robertson has been traveling to Uganda since 2005, where she first saw this rust colored cloth folded up in a roadside stall. Since, she has worked with artists, researchers, and community leaders in Uganda to assist in promoting and preserving this cloth.

In this lecture, Lesli will give a behind the scenes glimpse into her work and what she has learned from array of stakeholders who love this material, from fashion designers to 9th generation bark cloth makers. Look for her upcoming Maker to Maker: Ugandan Barkcloth hands-on virtual workshop at BRIT in January. Also, visit her studio, www.mekekadesigns.com, to learn more about her current work.

A mutuba tree with new, red roots emerging
A mutuba tree with new roots emerging
Paul and Vincent removing the bark from a mutuba tree
Paul and Vincent removing the bark from a mutuba tree

BIO:

Lesli Robertson is an interdisciplinary textile consultant and project developer who partners with local and international organizations to develop impactful engagement through interactive programs. She has recently worked on projects supported by USAID, the Smithsonian Institution, and Fulbright Specialist program, taking her to countries as diverse as Kuwait, Armenia, Uganda, and Ghana. She launched Mekeka Designs in 2018, creating bespoke textile collections with artisans in Uganda. As a former faculty at the University of North Texas, she spent more than a decade teaching textile and visual arts approaches while developing national and international community programs and opportunities.

Past Events